My Farmer and Me–Be Prepared…

15826537_calf-barn379630455723549_355823879606745035_nSo these are the calves I take care of on a daily basis. (A feeding video is forth coming)  Cute young animals at various stages of growth, but not too large. Something I have always been able to handle with few problems…I figure these guys all know me…the one who has been Momma to them since birth. At least that is how they act when I come into the barn…heads turn and watch every move I make, anticipating their turn with the scoop of grain or the leaf of hay. Heck, I even clean their ‘beds’ and put in fresh bedding every day…

That is until last Thursday…I had fed them all their evening feed and hay and was putting the dirty bedding into the gutter…no big deal. Well, it wasn’t until the larger white heifer with her head up looking this way in the photo, decided to let me have it with the left hind leg and then a side step to the left, connecting with the right side of my body and knocking me into the gutter…picture this…had a pitch fork in my right hand (actually using both hands) when she kicked my left leg below the knee and then a quick side step and wham…

Like slow motion, you know the kind of fall when you have enough time to say to yourself ‘this is gonna hurt’…her butt hit me hard enough to send me off balance and down I went. The entire length of the left side of my body was now in the gutter and my right leg was kind of over the outside curb, so that when I came to rest I caught the curb right in the middle of my back from my butt to the back of my head; kind of a shocker.

I was immediately concerned with my surgical incision from by-pass 2 years ago where they kind of dismantle your ribs in the front (and in my case sew them back together uneven). The blow to the back felt like I could have trouble with that…crazy how one’s mind works. Ed was in the other part of this barn, the milking parlor, so he didn’t hear me call to him.

Seems like it took 10 minutes for me to get myself up-righted, and check for serious injury. Figured I was all right, but really sore already. Landing on the gutter cleaner paddles didn’t help, but could have been much worse, I guess. Oh, and my clothes were covered with—-, but just on the left side!!!

A few bruises and still sore back, but all is good. Ed has taken to cleaning those ‘babies’ for a while until I get the urge to resume that duty. Who knows, maybe the urge won’t strike for a few, um, months??? I guess I should have been more prepared…

 

11 Comments

  1. Most of my injuries around livestock were when I didn’t expect it. Critters are masters at reading body language and they know just the moment we let our attention drift. The last time I landed in the manure channel I was a teenager. But that just means that the rest of the time they got me outside of the barn! Here’s a wish that you recover quickly. 💕

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  2. THERE A TWO JOBS THAT ARE THE MOST DANGEROUS; (1) IS THAT OF A LUMBERJACK, (2) IS THAT OF A FARMER.MOST FARMERS ARE AWARE OF THE DANGERS OF THEIR WORK, AND ARE VERY CAREFUL.WITH BEING CAREFUL, ACCIDENTS STILL HAPPEN. I’LL PRAY FOR YOUR IMPROVED RECOVERY

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  3. So sorry to hear of the incident with the cow. I hope you heal fast and with no lasting effects from the kick and/or the fall.

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  4. Carol, Heal quickly, take it easy for a while. I bet you never expected that kick. 99% of the time they don’t. It’s that 1% that catches you of guard. Cow kicks are quick and damn they sting. Keep us posted.

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